U.S. reports more than 100 coronavirus deaths in a single day, 500 total





U.S. states on Monday reported more than 100 deaths from the novel coronavirus, pushing the country’s total death toll past 500 and marking the first time single-day fatalities have risen into the triple-digits since the pandemic reached U.S. soil.
The virus has now claimed lives in at least 34 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, and has infected more than 41,000 people nationwide.
Here are some significant developments:
  • British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said at a news conference that all nonessential shops will close, travel will be restricted, and police will enforce social distancing if necessary.
  • President Trump is weighing calls from some Republican lawmakers and White House advisers to scale back steps to contain the coronavirus despite the advice of federal health officials. Senior U.S. health officials, including Anthony S. Fauci, who have said the worst of the pandemic has yet to be felt in the United States.
  • The nation’s governors are getting far better marks for their handling of the coronavirus outbreak than President Trump, according to a new Monmouth University poll. Fifty percent of Americans say Trump has done a good job handling the crisis, while 72 percent say governors have done a good job — results that are consistent regardless of party affiliation or severity of outbreak in a particular state.
  • Michigan, Ohio, Louisiana and Oregon became the latest states to announce stay-at-home orders. The governors of Maryland and Massachusetts ordered nonessential businesses to close, and Virginia’s governor said schools would remain closed for the rest of the academic year.
  • Virus-ravaged Italy marked 608 coronavirus deaths Monday, bringing its total to 5,476 — more than any other country. Spain extended its lockdown for another 15 days as the national death toll surged more than 25 percent. Spain now has more than 33,000 confirmed cases, and the prime minister warned that “the worst is yet to come.”
  • A man died in Phoenix after self-medicating with chloroquine phosphate to treat covid-19, Banner Health announced in a statement Monday.
    The man’s wife, who also self-medicated with chloroquine phosphate, is in critical care, according to Banner Health. The man was in his 60s, as is his wife. Banner Health did not identify either of them by name.
    This came just two days after President Trump suggested, in a tweet, that a mix of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin could be an effective treatment for covid-19. Neither drug had been approved by the Food and Drug Administration or World Health Organization as a treatment for the coronavirus, and has not been in the time since.
    “Given the uncertainty around COVID-19, we understand that people are trying to find new ways to prevent or treat this virus, but self-medicating is not the way to do so,” Daniel Brooks, medical director of Banner Health’s Poison and Drug Information Center, said in the statement.
    “The last thing that we want right now is to inundate our emergency departments with patients who believe they found a vague and risky solution that could potentially jeopardize their health.”
    Banner Health urged that chloroquine, a drug used to treat malaria, “should not be ingested to treat or prevent” the virus.
    On Saturday, after Trump endorsed hydroxychloroquine on Twitter, Nigeria reported two cases of chloroquine poisoning. That led Nigerian health officials to issue a warning against using the drug to treat the coronavirus, which was echoed by Banner Health after a related death.
  • Texas abortion providers must stop performing the procedure as part of the state’s temporary suspension of surgeries that are not medically necessary, the state’s attorney general said Monday.
    Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton confirmed that abortion providers were among the licensed health-care professionals who were under Gov. Greg Abbott’s order Saturday to postpone all surgeries and procedures that are not immediately medically necessary amid the novel coronavirus outbreak’s strain on medical supplies.
    “We must work together as Texans to stop the spread of COVID-19 and ensure that our health care professionals and facilities have all the resources they need to fight the virus at this time,” Paxton said in the statement.
    The announcement follows a similar order in Ohio, where abortion clinics received letters Friday from Republican Attorney General Dave Yost ordering them to cease all “nonessential” surgical abortions, The Post previously reported.
    Washington state and Massachusetts, who have also paused elective surgeries, say those restrictions do not apply to abortions.
    Critics accused Paxton and Yost of politicizing the moment, saying the procedure is time sensitive and shouldn’t be delayed.
    “When someone decides to have an abortion, it is critical that they receive timely care,” Jane’s Due Process, a nonprofit that offers legal representation to pregnant and parenting minors in Texas, tweeted after the news. “Today’s announcement from the TX Attorney General’s office is playing politics with essential healthcare.” 
  • Senegal’s military will begin enforcing a strict new curfew at midnight as coronavirus cases mount in the West African country.
    “I order the defense and security forces to be ready for the immediate and strict execution of the measures decreed throughout the national territory,” Senegalese President Macky Sall said Monday in a national address.
    Starting Tuesday, he said, people must stay home from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Travel between regions is banned. Airports have shuttered. Public gatherings are prohibited, and the government has earmarked billions of dollars for emergency food aid.
    “This moment is unprecedented in the history of humanity,” Sall said, declaring a national emergency.
    Senegal isn’t the first country to deploy its armed forces in the fight against covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. South Africa and Ghana also have sent troops to bolster their responses as tensions simmer.
    After Senegal ordered the closure of mosques last week, hundreds of people ignored the ban, filling the streets in protest. Officials have recorded more than 1,400 coronavirus cases in 40 countries on the continent. Senegal, one of the earliest-hit African nations, has confirmed 71 cases.

New U.S. fatalities exceed 100 for first time in a single day, pushing death toll past 500



U.S. states on Monday reported more than 100 deaths from the novel coronavirus, pushing the country’s total death toll past 500 and marking the first time single-day fatalities have risen into the triple-digits since the pandemic reached U.S. soil.
The virus has claimed lives in at least 34 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, and has infected more than 41,000 people nationwide, according to tracking by The Washington Post.
By Monday afternoon, three dozen states had reported new deaths. New York, the state hit hardest by the outbreak, reported the most, with 43 deaths. Louisiana, where new infections are spiking, reported 14, followed by New Jersey and Michigan, which reported seven each.
The new fatalities offer a stark illustration of the outbreak’s deepening human toll at a time when President Trump is considering scaling back containment efforts in hopes of preventing further economic turmoil. Trump and Vice President Pence said Monday that the federal government would reassess social distancing guidelines at the end of the month.
Public health officials have urged the administration not to backpedal on social distancing, saying such a move would undermine work to mitigate the virus and overwhelm hospitals, which are already facing shortages of tests, masks and other essential medical supplies.
During a visit to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Vice President Pence on Monday echoed President Trump's suggestion that the federal government will take another look at its social-distancing recommendations for all Americans at the end of March.
“We thought it was important for every American to take action as tens of millions are to help us slow the spread,” Pence told reporters at FEMA. “But at the end of this 15 days, we're going to get with our health experts, we're going to evaluate ways in which we might be able to adjust that guidance for the American people."
The 15-day period is set to expire March 30.
Late Sunday night, Trump suggested — in an all-caps tweet — he is considering restarting the economy and scaling back steps to contain the coronavirus pandemic, despite the advice of public health officials.
“WE CANNOT LET THE CURE BE WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM ITSELF,” Trump said in the tweet. “AT THE END OF THE 15 DAY PERIOD, WE WILL MAKE A DECISION AS TO WHICH WAY WE WANT TO GO!”
U.S. reports more than 100 coronavirus deaths in a single day, 500 total U.S. reports more than 100 coronavirus deaths in a single day, 500 total Reviewed by Anson Moore on March 23, 2020 Rating: 5

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